SIGN UP FOR THE LIFEMAG BRIEF

Receive our top articles each week direct to your inbox

Tissue regeneration in mice opens new possibilities for human tissue regrowth

by Valentina Lencautan Published on 16th Jun 2015

by Valentina Lencautan Published on 16th June 2015

A recent study carried out by Ellen Heber-Katz, PhD, of the Lankenau Institute for Medical Research (LIMR) has demonstrated that spontaneous tissue regeneration can be achieved in mice, without using additional stem cells. As reported in the Science Translational Medicine, this is possible thanks to a form of energy production present in mammals.  The discovery of the central driver of healthy regeneration of lost tisse, the HIF-1, will offer opportunities to design therapies and treatments for healthy tissue regeneration in humans. 

Scientists discovered that the oxygen regulatory HIF-1a pathway, employed also in embryonic development, can activate a regrowth process of tissue in mice, thus creating similar prospects for mammalian tissues. In Dr. Heber-Katz' investigations MRL mice have shown to be quite an exceptional species among the mammals for their ability to regenerate cartilage and other types of tissues.
Experiments consisted of down-regulating HIF-1a in MRL mice who received an ear hole punch, selecting a non regenerative strain and injecting a PHD inhibitor into the mice. 30 days later researchers were able to register ear healing and regrowth of cartilage and hair follicles.

According to Dr. Heber-Katz the study “shows the possibility of taking mature cells and, with addition of HIF-1a, causing dedifferentiation to a highly immature state where the cells can proliferate, followed by redifferentiation upon withdrawal of HIF-1a".

Read more @ Medicalxpress